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Summer Jobs for Teens

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Once upon a time, teenagers used to have to work for their pocket money. Do you remember those days?! Sure, as parents we all want to give our kids an easier road to success than we might have had ourselves, but a summer job can change a teenager’s life for the better. Let’s make summer great again, by getting our teenagers out of the house and into some very cool, life-changing summer jobs.

 

Summer jobs are just awesome

When teenagers work a summer job, the extra money they receive is more of an added bonus to all of the amazing things they’ll learn while working. Summer jobs do so much for young adults: here are the top 5 benefits.

  1. A summer job reduces the risk of dropping out of school

When teenagers hold down a summer job, they’re less likely to drop out of high school or college because working keeps them engaged, exposes them to mentors and new friends, and gives them a real sense of purpose.

  1. A summer job boosts confidence

High school students who work have more self-confidence than those who don’t. Why? Well, taking on the responsibility of a part-time or full-time job forces teens out of their comfort zones, getting them to try new things, and puts their abilities to the test.  These challenging experiences help create and boost confidence. As they get better at their jobs, they’ll feel better about themselves. Win-win!

  1. A summer job teaches time management

When we work, we understand the importance of time and pay better attention to how we spend it.  These time management skills benefit teens when they return to school, throughout their college years, and for the rest of their lives. Working over the summer will also keep them off their electronics which we all know is a huge time waster for unemployed youths.

  1. A summer job expands their universe

Working exposes teens to new people, cultures, ideas, and experiences. It even provides them with opportunities to explore their own identities, beliefs, and values by teaching them how to interact with other people, including difficult ones. Through learning more about the worlds that exist outside of their high schools and communities, they get to better understand where they fit in the world.

  1. A summer job gives them job experience

Working a summer job can make a difference to a teen’s future employment because it serves as experience they can put on their CV.  Even a little bit of job experience can give a teen a boost when it comes to getting a first job after high school or during university.

Being a teen is tough

Teens may be working less over the summer, but not all the blame rests squarely on their shoulders. Finding a job in a tough economy with few entry-level positions is hard. This explains the new trend among high school students filling their weeks with travel, internships and volunteer work to pad CVs for university.

But hunting for a summer job is worth the hard work. For instance, having a summer job shows initiative and a work ethic, which may be looked upon favorably by university admissions. Demonstrating experience in areas like customer service and working with the public are skills that are important for success later on.

Of course, most importantly, a summer job gives teenager the opportunity to earn money and learn how to manage it.

summer job 2

Best kinds of summer jobs for teens

Teens should seriously start thinking about employment when they’re around 15 or 16 years old. Heck, some kids start work at 9 with their milk and paper runs! Ok, when you’re older a paper run might be out of the question, but you’ve got options.

There are a wide range of jobs that are suitable for teens. Here are some of the best jobs that are likely to offer positions to teenagers over the summer:

Grocery Store Bagger/Cashier/Stocker

Many grocery stores have jobs for 14-16 year olds who are willing to bag groceries and provide basic customer service. Some may also hire teenagers for cashier and stocker positions.

Restaurant Cashier/Cook/Waiter

Many kiwi teenagers start their work life in restaurants, often at fast food places. At McDonalds and Subway, teens can work as cashiers or cooks. At restaurants, there are jobs available for clearing tables and dishwashing. Sure, it’s not glamourous, but if someone is dedicated and hard-working they can jump up to waitressing quite quickly.

Dog Walker

Teens who love dogs can tap into a bit of entrepreneurial spirit and start dog walking for neighbours in their community. If you’re reliable and trustworthy, customers might want you to walk their dog daily, or refer your services to friends.

Babysitter

Babysitting is one of the best jobs for teenagers to get because most families need one and you can charge a good hourly rate. All you need is a good reputation, reliability, and flexible availability.

It helps to try to get a job at a place where you want to work. For instance, cinemas and coffee shops might be willing to hire younger staff too. Businesses that typically hire teens are:

  • Restaurants – dishwasher, host, cashier
  • Movie Theaters – cashiers, ticket takers
  • Coffee Shops – barista, cashier
  • Bike Shops – cleaning, customer service
  • Fitness Centers – childcare, cleaning
  • Ice cream shops – scoopers, cleaners
  • Retail shops – sales, cashier
  • Grocery Stores – courtesy clerks, cleaning, stocking crew

How to find a job

If you’re a teen and you’re ready to start working you need to start the job search early before school is out. There are a limited number of summer positions employers need to fill, and once those are gone, it’ll be harder to find work. Don’t wait for those annoying university students to return home for the summer – they’re likely to snatch up the best positions!

Create a CV highlighting all of your strengths, volunteer experience, and unique skills. List unofficial jobs like babysitting, yard work, and small tasks. Don’t forget to highlight any academic achievements as well. Then, hop on Trade Me and Seek and see what’s out there. Pound the pavement too: head into your community and ask around in shops, or places you hang out at and see if they’re looking for help. They most likely are – but you won’t know unless you ask!

And if you’re lucky and get an interview, go in looking like the professional you are: you may be young but you can still dress well, be respectful, and show that you’re willing to work hard to get the job done.

summer job 3

Ka-ching

Getting your first job is so exciting, especially when that first pay check arrives in your bank account. You’ll notice on your payslip that there are quite a few dollars missing – that’s due to the taxes you have to pay. Bummer! But lucky for you you’ll probably get some of that money back when you file your tax return.

While you’re gaining valuable adult experience by working, no one expects you to be able to do your taxes at the same time. That’s where we come in: if you want to make sure you get your tax back, we can help. Get in touch with us today and we’ll make sure you see every hard-earned penny you’re owed from paying tax on that summer job!

Further Reading:

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2003/07/summer_lovin.html

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/american-teens-refuse-to-get-jobs-2016-06-10

https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/look-for-work/16-19-year-olds/index.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/investopedia/2013/06/04/10-great-summer-jobs-for-teens/#6830d7077f6a